Learning the guitar notes


Before you tune your guitar you must know the note names of each string and the tuning peg they are attached to. Here are some simple guidelines to get you started.

Standard Tuning: EADGBE

Learning the note names of each string is essential to tuning your guitar correctly. Looking down at your guitar the strings present themselves from the thickest string (E) to the thinest (also E). 

  • E - 6th string - thickest
  • A - 5th string
  • D - 4th string
  • G - 3rd string
  • B - 2nd string
  • E - 1st string - thinnest

I have found the best way for my students to memorise these strings is to assign a word for each string making a sentence like an acrostic poem. 

  • Eddie - 6th - thickest
  • Ate - 5th
  • Dynamite - 4th
  • Good - 3rd
  • Bye - 2nd
  • Eddie - 1st - thinnest
 
Guitar String Notes

In order to get these string names embedded into your brain I’ve made it into a rap below.

This is all you need to know if you’re tuning each string individually with a tuner, however if you would like to have a go at tuning your guitar strings mostly with out a tuner have a look at how to tune a guitar.

 

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FAQ


HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE ME TO MEMORISE THE STRINGS?

If you use the string note rap, not long at all. 


WHY DO I HAVE TO LEARN THE STRING NAMES?

Learning the string names is a necessity for every guitarist as it sets the foundation for tuning your guitar and also learning the notes of the guitar. Having an in tune guitar is also essential as it will help develop your ear in recognising how chords and note sound and relate to each other.


SHOULD I LEARN TO READ MUSIC?

Being able to read music is always a great asset for any musician. For a guitarists, this means they can take full advantage of over a century worth of guitar literature rich with all the guitar goodness. Learning to read also builds a level of comprehension that will ground your technique and musicianship in strong foundations proven with time.  As you can probably tell, I’m a big advocate of the musical language that is notation however, although these benefits are great, they aren’t a full necessity starting out as countless musicians have begun and continued there journey with out being able to fluently read. I would also argue that most great musicians who have started out this way and have gone on to achieve a high proficiency in their instrument, have then taken to learning notation and theory. Tablature is also a useful source for many guitarists as it’s quite easy interpret however, a lot of tablature doesn’t include rhythm and also won’t help you learn the actual notes of the guitar. I strongly recommend learning to read actual music notation as this will not only give you the skills to broaden your knowledge, but also help you identify the notes on the guitar.

 

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